402 spaces

A collection of inspirational artists and designers, transcending the boundaries of art in a space.

cross-connect:

Andrea Mastrovito born in Bergamo in 1978 is an multimedia artist whose dynamic works have acquired considerable recognition in recent years.Mastrovito uses cut paper and basic two-dimensional materials to create three-dimensional large-scale installations. His language becomes a symbolic and visual device, insignificant pieces become the protagonists of his narrative imagery and explosions of color are challenged against solid color blocked figures. Mastrovito lives and works between Bergamo and New York.

Represented by FOLEY gallery

// selected by Tu recepcja

(via cross-connect)

archiemcphee:

New York City-based artist Andy Yoder used thousands of hand-painted matchsticks to create this awesome globe. The painstaking process took him two years, during which each match was glued onto a foam and cardboard frame inside a plywood skeleton. Entitled Early One Morning, the sculpture measures 42” in diameter.

And in case you’re daydreaming about setting this matchstick Earth on fire, Yoder’s son, Redditor yoderaustin, explained that the entire piece has been doused with flame retardant.

Early One Morning will be on display from May 8 -11, 2014 at the PULSE New York Contemporary Art Fair.

Click here for additional photos.

[via Junkculture]

(via muags)

theatlantic:

This Man Took 445 Photobooth Portraits of Himself Over 30 Years, and Nobody Knows Why

For three decades, starting in the 1930s, he did the same thing. He’d sit inside a photo booth. He’d smile. He’d pose. 
And then—pop! pop! pop!—out would pop a glossy self-portrait, in shades of black and white. There he was, staring back at himself … and grinning. And, sometimes, almost scowling. There he was, mirthful. And, sometimes, almost scornful.  
The man—nobody knows who he was—repeated this process 455 times, at least, and he did so well into the 1960s. Nobody knows for sure why he did it. Or where he did it. All we know is that he took nearly 500 self-portraits over the course of thirty years, at a time when taking self-portraits was significantly more difficult than it is today, creating a striking record of the passage of time. 
The man’s effort is now being shared with the public in the form of a collection being shown at Rutgers’ Zimmerli Art Museum in New Brunswick. “445 Portraits of a Man,” the exhibit is appropriately called, takes these early, earnest selfies and presents them as art. 
Read more. [Image courtesy Donald Lokuta]

theatlantic:

This Man Took 445 Photobooth Portraits of Himself Over 30 Years, and Nobody Knows Why

For three decades, starting in the 1930s, he did the same thing. He’d sit inside a photo booth. He’d smile. He’d pose. 

And then—pop! pop! pop!—out would pop a glossy self-portrait, in shades of black and white. There he was, staring back at himself … and grinning. And, sometimes, almost scowling. There he was, mirthful. And, sometimes, almost scornful.  

The man—nobody knows who he was—repeated this process 455 times, at least, and he did so well into the 1960s. Nobody knows for sure why he did it. Or where he did it. All we know is that he took nearly 500 self-portraits over the course of thirty years, at a time when taking self-portraits was significantly more difficult than it is today, creating a striking record of the passage of time. 

The man’s effort is now being shared with the public in the form of a collection being shown at Rutgers’ Zimmerli Art Museum in New Brunswick. “445 Portraits of a Man,” the exhibit is appropriately called, takes these early, earnest selfies and presents them as art.

Read more. [Image courtesy Donald Lokuta]

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)